1.4.1. Getting Started

Aura.Router is a web router implementation for PSR-7.

You get all the router objects through a library-specific RouterContainer, which manages object creation, dependencies, and wiring for you. That means you need to instantiate the container before anything else.

<?php
use Aura\Router\RouterContainer;

$routerContainer = new RouterContainer();
?>

You can then retrieve a Map for adding routes, a Matcher for matching the incoming request to a route, and a Generator for generating paths from routes.

Let's go step-by-step to add a route, match a request against it, and dispatch it. A full working example is provided at the ended of this page.

1.4.1.1. Adding A Route

To add a route, first retrieve the Map from the RouterContainer.

<?php
$map = $routerContainer->getMap();
?>

Then call one of its route-adding methods:

Each route-adding method takes three parameters:

  1. A $name (for when you need to generate link from the route)
  2. A $path (with optional named token placeholders)
  3. An optional $handler (a closure, callback, action object, controller class, etc); if you do not pass a handler, the route will use the $name parameter as the handler.

For example, this route named blog.read will match against a GET request on the path /blog/42 (or any other {id} value). It also defines a closure as a handler for the route, using a ServerRequestInterface instance and a ResponseInterface instance as arguments.

<?php
$map->get('blog.read', '/blog/{id}', function ($request, $response) {
    $id = (int) $request->getAttribute('id');
    $response->getBody()->write("You asked for blog entry {$id}.");
    return $response;
});
?>

If you want to add a route with a custom HTTP verb, call $map->route() and follow with a fluent call to allows():

<?php
$map->route('route-name', '/route/path', function () { ... })
    ->allows('CUSTOMVERB');
?>

1.4.1.2. Matching A Request To A Route

First, get the Matcher from the RouterContainer.

<?php
$matcher = $routerContainer->getMatcher();
?>

Then call the match() method to match a PSR-7 ServerRequestInterface instance to a mapped Route.

For this you need an implementation of psr-7 .

The most widely used one is zend-diactoros.

composer require zendframework/zend-diactoros

Create an instance of ServerRequestInterface object.

$request = Zend\Diactoros\ServerRequestFactory::fromGlobals(
    $_SERVER,
    $_GET,
    $_POST,
    $_COOKIE,
    $_FILES
);

and pass $request to match method.

<?php
/**
 * @var Psr\Http\Message\ServerRequestInterface $request
 */
$route = $matcher->match($request);
?>

1.4.1.3. Dispatching A Route

This is the point at which your application takes over. The route has two properties that you are most likely to be interested in:

For example, with the $route in hand, you can transfer its attributes to the $request ...

<?php
foreach ($route->attributes as $key => $val) {
    $request = $request->withAttribute($key, $val);
}
?>

... and dispatch to the route handler directly if it was a callable or closure:

<?php
$callable = $route->handler;
$response = $callable($request);
?>

Alternatively, if you used a class name for the handler, you can create a class from the handler and do what you like with it:

<?php
$actionClass = $route->handler;
$action = new $actionClass();
$response = $action($request);
?>

1.4.1.4. Handling Failure To Match

When $map->match() returns empty, it means there was no matching route for the request. However, we can still discover the closest-matching failed route, and which rule it failed to match against.

Your application might do something like the following:

<?php
$route = $matcher->match($request);
if (! $route) {
    // get the first of the best-available non-matched routes
    $failedRoute = $matcher->getFailedRoute();

    // which matching rule failed?
    switch ($failedRoute->failedRule) {
        case 'Aura\Router\Rule\Allows':
            // 405 METHOD NOT ALLOWED
            // Send the $failedRoute->allows as 'Allow:'
            break;
        case 'Aura\Router\Rule\Accepts':
            // 406 NOT ACCEPTABLE
            break;
        default:
            // 404 NOT FOUND
            break;
    }
}
?>

1.4.1.5. Working Example

The following is a working example. First, at the command line, require the necessary libraries:

$ composer require aura/router zendframework/zend-diactoros

Then create the following file as index.php:

<?php
// set up composer autoloader
require __DIR__ . '/vendor/autoload.php';

// create a server request object
$request = Zend\Diactoros\ServerRequestFactory::fromGlobals(
    $_SERVER,
    $_GET,
    $_POST,
    $_COOKIE,
    $_FILES
);

// create the router continer and get the routing map
$routerContainer = new Aura\Router\RouterContainer();
$map = $routerContainer->getMap();

// add a route to the map, and a handler for it
$map->get('blog.read', '/blog/{id}', function ($request) {
    $id = (int) $request->getAttribute('id');
    $response = new Zend\Diactoros\Response();
    $response->getBody()->write("You asked for blog entry {$id}.");
    return $response;
});

// get the route matcher from the container ...
$matcher = $routerContainer->getMatcher();

// .. and try to match the request to a route.
$route = $matcher->match($request);
if (! $route) {
    echo "No route found for the request.";
    exit;
}

// add route attributes to the request
foreach ($route->attributes as $key => $val) {
    $request = $request->withAttribute($key, $val);
}

// dispatch the request to the route handler.
// (consider using https://github.com/auraphp/Aura.Dispatcher
// in place of the one callable below.)
$callable = $route->handler;
$response = $callable($request, $response);

// emit the response
foreach ($response->getHeaders() as $name => $values) {
    foreach ($values as $value) {
        header(sprintf('%s: %s', $name, $value), false);
    }
}
echo $response->getBody();

Now start built in PHP server ...

$ php -S localhost:8000 -t .

... and point your browser to http://localhost:8000/blog/12 .